Judge, But Don’t

Every skeptic has the same favorite Bible verse. “Judge not, lest you be judged also. (Mat 7:1)” It’s weaponized and wielded as a means to shut down dissenting opinions of believers when they are, apparently, being too harsh. Is there legitimacy to it?

Sort of. 

Before we decipher, it’s important to first see what Jesus is not saying. Later in the same chapter Jesus tells His listeners that they will know someone “by their fruits.” In other words, one can judge someone’s content by the product of their behavior, similar to how one would determine a tree by its fruit. So He is not saying, categorically, to not judge.

What this seems to mean is that there is legitimacy in judging a person’s actions. Where one gets into trouble is when he judges an individual or that person’s intents. I have full license to judge what a person does, but I ought to exercise restraint in judging them or their motives.

I’ve personally discovered another element that complicates matters, and this complication helps to reveal why judging others turns into self-judgement. Really there are two elements that tie together. 

The first is that human beings have a tendency to project. We spend a lot of time with ourselves and become accustomed with our flaws and insecurities- whether we realize it or not. This develops into an acute awareness (or imaginary projection) of character flaws or intentions in others that we actually (perhaps unknowingly) observe in ourselves. Also, we may make assumptions about others that are informed by insecurities wrought in us through prior experiences. In both cases, we are projecting onto someone else a version of themselves that has been created in or informed by our own subconscious.

Secondly, God conveys throughout Scripture the notion of cosmic fairness. If we do not forgive others, He says that He will not forgive us. By what standards we judge others, we will be judged also. Our judgement is obscured. Only God is licensed and able to fairly judge a person or their intentions.

Do not judge, because when you condemn others you are actually condemning yourself (via both psychological projection and the cosmic fairness principal) and also because you are not omniscient or innocent. Only God is both fully morally upright and omniscient. Only He is qualified to judge.

But you have every right to judge a person’s actions, and when someone is made uncomfortable by that, they don’t prove that you are judgemental. They only prove that they condemn themselves with their own actions. Whenever one scornfully wields Scripture as a weapon, they wield it against themselves.

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Pain and Reward

Everything would be easier with a magic wand, or at least a genie. Then again, magic is too complicated. Even if one could remove all the darkness from black magic it’d still be undesirable. It’s too much discipline. Sure there are perks to utilizing spells to mimic your reality, but there are always stipulations and consequences. A genie is easier- ask and you receive. There are stipulations, but there’s nothing in the way of discipline. Discipline is painful. All gain and no pain- it’d literally be magical.

Imagine uploading foreign language or martial arts abilities into your brain, like Neo in the Matrix. Imagine suddenly gaining the ability to shred on the guitar or write a symphony. I once read about a guy who got struck by lightening and suddenly became a musical savant. Even he had to work at it- it just came more easily to him. Imagine that you could suddenly transform your messy house into a clean one, your broken car into a fixed one, your diseased body into a healthy one. Imagine that you could sculpt your muscles and get stronger just by thinking about it. It’d be nice, wouldn’t it?

Most of us are lazy, and we only remain productive because of random bursts of inspiration or motivation. Everything comes and goes in fits and starts. Somehow we manage to be productive. But sometimes it feels like you’re driving uphill with a busted radiator. The car overheats every fifteen minutes, and you have to stop to douse the engine. It’s impossible not to think wishfully sometimes.

But it’s all wrong. The real excitement or joy of an accomplishment or reward is that it was gained through discipline. Discipline is really painful at times. Harrowing life experiences that force you to bail out or become brave are painful. Goals drive us, but processes shape us. Sometimes our goal is to learn a skill or become healthier or more fit. Sometimes our goal is just to make it out in one piece. Whatever the goal may be, the discipline required to remain focused and active toward that goal has a transcendent sort of quality.

So next time you are dreading the hard work you must put in or you are ruing  the emotional distress you’re about to endure, take heart and remember that the process both shapes you and makes your reward truly rewarding. Don’t let laziness make all the hard work seem like a drag. Remember that life is process, and desires [for goals] are put inside us to drive us. Without that, our existence would be pretty unfulfilling and depressing. Be thankful for the pain, because a magic wand would just make it all more difficult.