A Word About Smugness

“Bigotry may be roughly defined as the anger of men who have no opinions. It is the resistance offered to definite ideas by that vague bulk of people whose ideas are indefinite to excess.”

-G. K. Chesterton

trump-maga-hat

For the last year or more I have engaged in something of a social endeavor. I have been a supporter of Donald Trump since July of 2015 and have advocated since then that he would be the next President of the United States of America. While most people I met have been ardent naysayers, I have encountered a small number of people who have shared this opinion. Due to the egregious behaviors of Trump’s many haters, my first thought was not to express my support in an especially outward fashion. But then the haters became legion, and I decided to stand up to them.

What began as mere public expression of support for Trump has turned into something more outward. I have plastered the front of my apartment with Trump signs, and I now wear my “Make American Great Again” hat almost daily. The opposition mainly began back in March when a couple of guys tried to fight with me over my hat. Since then, several conversations have erupted over the hat, and I have had to deescalate a few before they got too heated.

In the environments I often put myself, it is basically anathema to be a Trump supporter. So many people are rooted in identity politics. In lieu of formulating independent thoughts and seeking to understand the opinions of others, they have this grotesque tendency to flock to some slew of perspectives wrapped up in their social groups. I wear the hat for three reasons.

The first reason is that I am a huge supporter of Donald Trump for President. It is very important not to self-censor out of fear of reprisal from our peers. Self-censorship is so very dangerous because the standards demanding censorship are always eroding. What is dignified today is bigotry tomorrow. There is little sense to any of it because it is all drawn from the well of whatever modern narrative is fashionable.

The second reason I wear that hat is to embolden others to express their own opinions openly. I don’t only wish to embolden other Trump supporters, but to embolden any who have a desire to express their opinions, regardless of unpopularity with the status quo. By me choosing not to censor in this little way, I may encourage others to do the same.

The third reason that I wear the hat is that I want to force others to challenge their own assumptions that are driven by their identity politics. Last week I went out to see a band I used to listen to in high-school. During the show, I was shown that someone had snapped a picture of the back of my head- on which I was wearing a backwards MAGA hat- and posted it to Instagram. Once I discovered it, I commented on the photo cheekily and approached her in person and had a little laugh. She asked if I wore the hat ironically. After I told her it was not ironic, she expressed her utter disarray that I could both be a Trump supporter and attend a “punk show.”

I receive this question a lot. People frequently ask me if I wear the hat ironically. Sometimes I respond to them with confusion and ask them why on earth I would ironically promote somebody I didn’t like. They never have an answer. You see, in light of their identity politics, I am either a jokester or a total deviant because they think that Trump is non-serious or a deviant. Their perspective hinders them from seeing that reality is much bigger than their narrow view can grasp.

The smugness I see in my peers is among the most disgusting things I have had to witness in my entire life. Whenever I respond to these people with an honest opinion, they almost always respond with rolled eyes or a horrible and snide expression. Whenever I turn the question around on them, they never have anything meaningful to say at all. The takeaway is that because they do not have a candidate that they like that am not allowed to have a candidate that like. Furthermore, it is expected that I should defend myself from their hallucinations about my candidate. But when the question is turned around, they have nothing to say because: cognitive dissonance.

I enjoy the fact that the hat can lend itself to discussion. I have greatly enjoyed some of the discussions I have had with Trump opponents and supporters alike. What I will never regard is the abhorrent smugness of the people of my generation who cannot conceive of a diversity of opinions amongst their social sects. They judge any divergent opinion as bigotry but never realize that their demands for censorship and their group-think are bigotry defined.